repent! and be saved?

Just another traveler on life’s highway hanging out in the slow lane.  It’s quiet.  It’s peaceful.  Beyond the horizon is rest calling my name.  Green pastures, still waters, my cup is overflowing.
aquatic-plant-beautiful-bloom-612797

Today, the thought ‘repent and be saved’ for some reason entered my brain and stayed there for a few moments.  Whoa!  Did I have a really good time last night that this morning I don’t remember?  Many years ago that would have been a legitimate concern when I staggered home and to bed in a black out too drunk to remember how I got home.  But today I don’t drink alcohol and I don’t smoke weed.  Yes, I still screw up and do unspiritual things, but now I have a memory to remind me that amends and corrections need to be made.

When I sat down to my blog, I googled “repent and be saved.”  The first entry was this:

Before anyone can be saved, they need to come to the realization that they’re sinners and believe that Jesus died and rose again so their sins could be forgiven.  That is what the phrase “repent and be saved” means.  Therefore, when we’ve asked Jesus to be our savior, the repenting has been done.

Ohhhh, I would love to pick this apart, but I’ll focus on the word repent.  What does that conjure up in your mind?  Yeah, me too.  I am totally unworthy of living on this earth because I am an immoral piece of human flesh who is absolutely devoid of any redeeming qualities which would satisfy the white-haired, fire-breathing, judgmental old man sitting in heaven with lightning bolts in hand ready to zap me for being a human failure.  If I don’t repent I’ll never be a part of the heaven crowd.

The implication of the word repent is moralistic.  It is used far too often by preachers and religionists intent on controlling a gullible audience being primed to swallow their particular brand of theology.  Some of the church-goers in my past drank like I did, lied like I did, cheated like I did, repented and got themselves saved and felt assured of a place beside Jesus in heaven.  They continued on with a life of drunkenness, lies, and cheating.  Didn’t change a thing about themselves, but they claimed they were saved by the blood of Jesus.  Yeah, OK.  I’ve got some swamp land down here in Florida that’s going to be prime beach front real estate in a few years.  Interested?

We know that the scriptures which comprise our New Testament were translated from ancient writings composed during the first 2 centuries following the walk of Jesus, the Christ, on this earth.  They were written in Greek.  In subsequent translations of the original manuscripts, the Greek word metanoia was translated as repent. The word repent lent a more powerful, moralistic connotation for a budding Roman Catholic church intent on religious and political control.

If you have a Concordance, look it up.  The Greek metanoia also means “to change.”  For me this was a game-changer.  I am no longer being judged; rather, I am being challenged.  I am being urged to change my mind about life, about Jesus, about God, about me.  And it is not a once and done deal.  This will be an ongoing, everyday process growing into the example presented to me – Jesus, the Christ.  Paul is attributed the book of Romans.  In it he writes in chapter 12, verse 2:

Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think.  Then you will learn to know God’s will for you, which is good and pleasing and perfect.

Remember what Jesus said to the woman accused of adultery facing stoning at the hands of the scribes and Pharisees?  In their eyes she had committed a grave sin and deserved death by stoning.  In Jesus’ mind she had done wrong just as every man standing there had also erred.  They were made to realize that none were perfect.  One by one the accusing scribes and Pharisees left until there were only Jesus and the woman.  He did not condemn her nor throw moral judgement on her.  He simply told her to go and not make the same mistakes again.  He told her to change her life.

Mark 1:15 quotes Jesus as saying:

The time has come.  The kingdom of God has come near.  Repent and believe the good news.

Change your thinking and believe the good news.

ROMANS 12:2 

JOHN 8:4-11

MARK 1:15

cropped-candle.png

salvation-noun or verb?

smiley-face-2Just another traveler on life’s highway, hanging out in the slow lane.  It’s quiet, it’s peaceful; beyond the horizon is rest calling my name.  Green pastures, still waters, my cup overflows.

 

Sometimes we get caught up in Christianity’s preponderance with salvation.  This basic tenet says to us, in contemporary Christianity, that the goal of our faith walk should be salvation thus guaranteeing a place in God’s eternity.  Take the New Testament walk through the verses of salvation, become saved and born again, and miraculously a seat is reserved beside Jesus at the throne of Almighy God.  Unfortunately, for mankind, that viewpoint of salvation allows us to escape the primary command to live our lives humbly with graciousness, compassion, honor, respect, and love for the Creation.  We did the salvation thing and life can now continue as before because we’ve been “saved”.

Eternity happens later and there is no reason to become concerned with it in this life because we have achieved salvation.  There is no dire need to transform or evolve into the present Kingdom surrounding us and residing within us.

That transformation and evolution would require change of heart and change of mind, would it not?  It would require reworking the internal me.  Yes, I too followed that train wreck of modern evangelical Christianity until I realized, “Hey, if I’m born again, if I’m saved, why has nothing in my life changed?”  The answer came to me through the fellowship which led me into sobriety.  One of the primary observances of AA was a verse found in the book of James:

“For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.”  James 2:26

Faith without works is a dead faith because the lack of works reveals an unchanged life or a spiritually dead heart.  That verse in James revealed to me that I could not rest on my laurels just because I claimed salvation.  The profession of being “born again” was just the start of a new way of living my life following the example of Jesus, the Christ.  I could not continue being the man I was before my proclamation.

I found it insightful to rethink the word salvation.  One of the definitions in the dictionary is 1) deliverance from sin and damnation, but another is simply 2) redemption.  Redeeming has less of a moral conviction, it denotes recovery and that is what I, a man who had followed the wrong trail in life, had to do after realizing my life needed to change.  My relationship with the ever-present Higher Power needed to be reclaimed.  An admission of the failure of my self-directed life was a starting point, I claimed rebirth, but that certainly could not be the end of the story.

My story is not appreciated by many Christians.  My story shakes their preconceived, theology-controlled concepts of the meaning of the Gospel and salvation.  Yet, upon study and research my story walks along the paths of Jesus and the Buddha.  Jesus and “the Way”, Buddha and “the Path” give me indisputable guidance in negotiating the Christian volumes of “thou shalt and thou shalt not” which have evolved from a very simple message which taught, not preached, how to become a part of Creation, not apart from Creation.”  Jack Wintz, Will I See My Dog in Heaven? (Paraclete Press: 2009), 29.

CANDLE